Movement Disorders Program

Movement Disorders Program

Dr. Ebrahimi-Fakhari directs the Movement Disorders Program at Boston Children’s Hospital. The team at the Movement Disorders Program provides specialty care for infants, children, and adolescents with genetic and acquired movement disorders. The team includes neurologists with special training in movement disorders, genetic counselors, physical and occupational therapists, and social workers. We work together to develop a treatment plan that meets every child’s unique needs and maximizes quality of life.

The treatment portfolio also includes specialized procedures, such as the treatment of spasticity and dystonia with botulinum toxin injections, and the treatment of dystonia and other hyperkinetic movement disorders with Deep Brain Stimulation (DBS).

Specialists in the Movement Disorders Program lead several research programs and clinical trials that work synergistically with our clinical care. We collaborate closely with clinicians and researchers across North America and internationally.

The Movement Disorders Program at Boston Children’s Hospital offers a unique clinical fellowship in Pediatric Movement Disorders & Neurogenetics The goal of this clinical training program is to provide fellows with the skills to become experts in the diagnosis and treatment of pediatric movement disorders, with a particular focus on genetic movement disorders. The core component of the clinical education consists of evaluating patients in the Boston Children’s Hospital Movement Disorders Program and select clinics within the Movement Disorders Divisions at Massachusetts General Hospital and Beth Israel Deaconess Medical Center. Clinical activities are overseen by faculty with sub-specialty training in movement disorders. The program also includes training in neurogenetics, rare disease research, precision medicine approaches, and specialized techniques and procedures for movement disorders, such as deep brain stimulation and botulinum toxin injections.

We hope to train the next generation of physician-scientists in cutting edge clinical care, translational research and hope for our fellows to become leaders in the field of pediatric movement disorders.

Current Fellows

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Vicente Quiroz, M.D.

Clinical Fellow, Movement Disorders Program, Class of 2024

Residency
Pediatric Neurology 2021
University of Valparaiso, Valparaiso, Chile

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Kathryn Yang, MBChB, FRCPC

Clinical Fellow, Movement Disorders Program, Class of 2025

Residency
Pediatric Neurology 2023
The Hospital for Sick Children, Toronto, CA

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Zainab Zaman, MBBS

Clinical Fellow, Movement Disorders Program, Class of 2026 (incoming fellow)

Residency
Child Neurology and Neurodevelopmental Disabilities 2024
Boston Children’s Hospital

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Monica Ferrer Socorro, M.D.

Clinical Fellow, Movement Disorders Program, Class of 2026 (incoming fellow)

Residency
Child Neurology 2025
NYU Grossman School of Medicine

 

For more information on applying to our fellowship program, please visit BCH’s Clinical Fellowship in Pediatric Movement Disorders & Neurogenetics page.

Tri-Institutional Seminar Series on Pediatric Movement Disorders 2024-2025

This seminar series is organized between the Pediatric Movement Disorders Programs at Boston Children’s Hospital in Boston, the Hospital for Sick Children in Toronto, and Children’s National Medical Center in Washington, D.C..

DateSpeakerTopic
9/4/24Course Directors:
Carolina Gorodetsky, MD (SickKids)
Laura Tochen, MD (Children’s National)
Darius Ebrahimi-Fakhari, MD, PhD (BCH)
Introduction to the classification and phenomenology of childhood-onset movement disorders
9/12/24Carolina Gorodetsky, MD (SickKids)
Laura Tochen, MD (Children’s National)
Darius Ebrahimi-Fakhari, MD, PhD (BCH)
Introduction to symptomatic management of childhood-onset movement disorders
9/19/24Carolina Gorodetsky, MD
The Hospital for Sick Children
Introduction to deep brain stimulation
10/10/24Jonathan Mink, MD, PhD
University of Rochester Medical Center
Transient or developmental movement disorders and stereotypes
10/24/24Travis Larsh, MD
Cincinnati Children’s Hospital
Functional Neurological Disorders
10/31/24Tamara Pringsheim, MD
Alberta Children’s Hospital
Tics & Tourette Syndrome (3 pm EST)
11/07/24Rebecca Lindsay, MD
Alberta Children’s Hospital
Resident Case Presentation
12/05/24Kathryn Yang, MBChB
Boston Children’s Hospital
Management of Status Dystonicus
12/12/24Jennifer O’Malley, MD
Stanford Medicine Children’s Health
Deep Brain Stimulation in Dystonia (3pm EST)
10/31/24Tamara Pringsheim, MD
Alberta Children’s Hospital
Tics & Tourette Syndrome (3 pm EST)
11/07/24Rebecca Lindsay, MD
Alberta Children’s Hospital
Resident Case Presentation
12/05/24Kathryn Yang, MBChB
Boston Children’s Hospital
Management of Status Dystonicus
12/12/24Jennifer O’Malley, MD
Stanford Medicine Children’s Health
Deep Brain Stimulation in Dystonia (3pm EST)
12/19/24Carolina Gorodetsky, MD
The Hospital for Sick Children
Deep Brain Stimulation for Status Dystonicus
1/30/25Terence Sanger, MD
Children’s Hospital of Orange County
Deep Brain Stimulation in Cerebral Palsy (3 pm EST)
2/13/25Weston Northam, MD
Boston Children’s Hospital
Selective Dorsal or Combined Rhizotomy and Intrathecal Baclofen Pumps
2/27/25Maria-Roser Pons, MD
Agia Sofia Hospital, University of Athens
Infantile and Early Childhood Parkinsonism
3/6/25Lisette Koens, MD
University Medical Center Groningen
Myoclonus in Pediatric Movement Disorders
3/27/25Vicente Quiroz, MD
University of Valparaiso
The Spectrum of Epilepsy-Dyskinesia Syndromes
4/24/25Shekeeb Mohammad, MD
University of Sydney
Autoimmune-mediated Movement Disorders (4 pm EST)
5/1/25David Lynch, MD
Children’s Hospital of Philadelphia
Overview of Friedreich’s Ataxia
5/8/25The Hospital for Sick ChildrenFellow Case Presentation
6/5/25Penny Hogarth, MD
Oregon Health & Science University
Pantothenate Kinase-Associated Neurodegeneration (PKAN) (3 pm EST)

Below is the schedule for the previous season:

Supporting the Rare Disease Community

We believe that the work of our laboratory should not only be confined to advancing science, but that we should also strive to engage the broader community. Through a variety of outreach efforts, we believe that we can help make our scientific communities more inclusive and learn from the diverse perspectives these experiences provide.